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Posts Tagged ‘delaware’

D-Day is Coming to Delaware

November 29th, 2010 2 comments

Delaware is no longer a Bottle Bill state! Redeem all of your containers now–before it’s too late.

The Delaware Beverage Container Law (aka “the Bottle Bill”) is undergoing a dramatic change. Please be aware that in early 2011, returnable beverage containers will no longer be refundable. Information on the current Delaware Beverage Container Law (some aspects taking effect in December 2010, others in early 2011), can be found here. Information below explains the changes in beverage container sales and returns as mandated through Senate Bill 234.

Background

On June 8, 2010, Senate Bill 234 was signed into law. This piece of legislation does many things, one of which is replacing the Delaware Beverage Container Law. The 5¢ deposit will transition into a 4¢ fee. This fee will go into a temporary recycling fund that will help expand recycling programs. This fee will automatically be removed in 2014. Beginning in early 2011, beverage containers will not be redeemable in Delaware for a deposit. Several opportunities exist for you to recycle beverage containers. You can learn about those opportunities by contacting your waste hauler (or other waste haulers), the Delaware Solid Waste Authority, or the Solid & Hazardous Waste Management Branch.

Consumers

  • You will no longer be able to redeem returnable beverage containers after January 31, 2011.
  • Stores will continue to refund deposits until that date.
  • The definitions and responsibilities with regard to this process will remain in effect until January 31, 2011.

Dealers/Retailers

  • Starting December 1, 2010, you should not be charging deposits on returnable beverage containers.
  • You must continue to refund returnable beverage containers to consumers through January 31, 2011. The definitions and responsibilities with regard to this process will remain in effect through that date.
  • As of February 1, 2011 you will no longer have that responsibility and you should no longer refund deposits to consumers.
  • You have until February 28, 2011 to redeem returnable beverage containers to distributors.
  • You will need to remit the 4¢ per beverage container fee to the Division of Revenue. This begins December 1, 2010 and includes the types of beverage containers that previously held a Delaware deposit value.

Retail Beverage Container License and Recycling Fee frequently-asked questions

Distributors/Manufacturers

  • Starting December 1, 2010, you should not be charging deposits on returnable beverage containers.
  • You must continue to refund returnable beverage containers to dealers through February 28, 2011. The definitions and responsibilities with regard to this process will remain in effect through that date.
  • As of March 1, 2011 you will no longer have that responsibility and you should no longer refund deposits to dealers.

We’re sorry to see Delaware revert its recycling policies–now we’re down to ten bottle bill states. With some luck and a bit of hard work, Tennessee and Texas will soon join those ten.

Original posting available on the State of Delaware site

Delaware Goes to the Dark Side

May 23rd, 2010 2 comments

Delaware replaces venerable bottle deposits with recycling fee

Delaware has instituted a controversial 4-cent non-refundable recycling fee to replace its 28-year-old bottle bill that required a 5-cent deposit on plastic and glass soft drink and beer bottles.

What a tragedy!

“We are extremely disappointed they chose to repeal their law, rather than enforce it,” said Susan Collins, executive director of the Container Recycling Institute, based in Culver City, Calif. “This is really anathema to our approach. We support extended producer responsibility where producers and consumers pay for the life cycle costs of the packaging.”

The other ten states in the U.S. with bottle deposit bills have bottle recycling rates that exceed 70 percent. But Delaware officials testified during their legislative battle that the state’s bottle recycling rate was only 12 percent because many retailers refused to accept returned bottles.

The bill, which the Legislature approved May 11, establishes a 4-cent per container recycling fee, starting December 1. It is designed to provide start-up funds to help waste-haulers start single-stream curbside recycling.

The bill mandates that all municipal and private waste haulers provide such curbside recycling pickup for single-family homes starting September 15, 2011, for multi-family residences starting January 1, 2013, and for commercial sites by 2014.

The fee is scheduled for sunset December 1, 2014 or after $22 million is raised.

Delaware Gov. Jack Markell supports the bill and is expected to sign it into law. However, several Republican legislators have said they would challenge the law in court, as the tax amounts to a new fee. According to state law, bills that mandate new fees need a 75 percent majority to pass, which the bill did not receive.

Collins said the repeal of the Delaware bottle bill, while certainly unwelcome, won’t have much effect on the national bottle recycling rate.

Delaware has less than 900,000 people and its now-repealed bottle bill only covered 19 percent of beverages sold in Delaware, Collins said. “The impact to the national recycling rate is likely to be less than one-tenth of 1 percent.”

Conversely, the addition of water bottles to the Connecticut and New York bottle bills last year could increase the amount of beverage containers recycled nationwide by 2 percentage points if the bottles added to those deposit laws are recycled at the same recycling rate as in other bottle bill states, she said.

“This is a pretty unusual approach,” Collins said of the Delaware bill. “This tax places a burden on consumers only and has them paying for curbside, apartment and even commercial recycling. Consumers will be subsidizing the producers and that is unfair.”

The Delaware law goes against recent trends, as a number of states (Texas, Tennessee, Oklahoma) are now looking at expanding bottles or at extended producer responsibility laws to reduce waste and advance recycling.

Original Story on Plastics News