Archive

Author Archive

Social Media Decals Connect You with Customers

April 8th, 2015 3 comments

Social media decal are designed to connect you with your customers. Today, practically everyone has a presence on social media. However, not all of your customers are aware that your brand is represented online. Social media decals let your customers and potential customers know where to find you. This enables you to provide more information to people who are curious about your brand as well as remind current customers of the products and services you offer. In addition, content you post on social media sites may potentially be shared by your followers to provide even greater exposure. Whether your brand is represented on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter or all three, social media decals can help you reach more customers.

Facebook allows you to interact with customers and get feedback on products and services. This makes it an outstanding medium for a product launch or special promotion. You can gauge how receptive your audience is to your offers by their engagement with your posts. It opens communication with those who use your products to provide information on how they may be improved. Facebook social media decal can help grow your fan base and increase interactions with consumers to enable you to provide better customer support. Placing them on the door or window of your establishment not only attracts those entering the establishment but people who see them in passing.

If you want to post a product demonstration or have discovered a great new way to use one of your products, there is no better way to share it with others than on YouTube. Building a following on your business’ YouTube channel enables you to provide useful content for viewers that can lead to sales. A YouTube social media decal will inform others that they can find out more about your products and services by video. YouTube videos are extremely popular and shared on practically every other social network. As a result, one follower who found you by means of a social media decal can result in dozens more.

Read more…

Categories: materials Tags: ,

Ecycler and our Journey

February 20th, 2014 2 comments

With much fanfare, we launched ecycler at TechCrunch50—it was September 2009. Our primary goal was to create the one stop place for recycling. We moved beyond traditional recycling (paper, bottles, etc.) into what we called, shippables. These materials are recyclable, but not having enough value for someone to pick them up. The third phase (never implemented) would have been junk pickup.

ecycler Founders at TechCrunch50 - 2009

We focused our energies on growth, not revenues.

We won $20,000 during the Fairfield Challenge for demonstrating our Social Media prowess—including a facebook best page commendation from Inc. Magazine—awesome! For the challenge, we visited 13 cities over 15 stays at the Fairfield Inn–we talked to business owners about how to make their recycling easier. And, many registered on ecycler to try us out.

With the winnings, we commissioned an iPhone app, a fun recycling game called iCanRecycle. We also invested in the ecycler Canada site–thanks Vancouver for being our guinea pig.

We’ve recycled hundreds of pounds of materials via the site; everything from aluminum cans to VHS tapes to Crayons. And, we had some fun along the way with our weekly Crush that Can episodes, all of which can still be viewed by following that to YouTube.

But, our magic wasn’t enough to maintain the business plan. As of the end of 2013, we’ve shuttered ecycler, a (once) new way to recycle online.

We’ve since sold off the ecycler.ca (and e-cycler.ca) domains and a few others including GirlsofRecycling.com.

Thanks to everyone that had a chance to make the world a better place by recycling something with ecycler. For the time being, we’ve taken down the main site and replaced with our blog. Please take advantage of the years’ worth of knowledge collected here and learn a thing or two about recycling!

So long, and thanks for all the fish!

 

Categories: ecycler Tags: ,

Social Media: From Virtual to Real World

March 14th, 2013 No comments

The recent rise in social media has enabled ecycler (and many other businesses) to get in front of more customers than they ever would have been able to before.

The recognition that social media sites have created for various brands can work offline, as well. Companies can include their twitter handle or facebook page address in traditional marketing campaigns or post it on decals in their brick-and-mortar stores to point customers to their products and services online.

The possibilities for harnessing the power of social media offline are limitless. Ecycler, for example, has labeled all of its recycle bins located at various businesses and restaurants. Also, the front door to ecycler HQ has a social media window decal applied to it; these are available for anyone to attach on their establishment’s windows and doors. Companies could, perhaps, print their social media information on shopping bags, the sides of city buses and on billboards. It’s basically double advertising-– social media engages consumers with brands in the virtual world and points real world customers-–or potential customers-–to their brand online.

The logos and identities of the top social media sites-–including twitter, YouTube and facebook-–are so recognizable to people now, that once they see that a product or service they like has a social media presence, they are more likely to seek that company out online, too. That can lead to more purchases-–and therefore more revenue for your business.

Another fantastic way to let someone really know about your business is adding your QR code to your advertising. This will allow people to scan your offline social media ad with any QR code supported phone and learn more information about your business. Everything they need to know about your business will pop up on their phone.

We recommend Social Media Decals for your windows!

ecycler_QRCode

 

Categories: ecycler Tags: ,

Here Comes Earth Hour 2012

March 9th, 2012 No comments

Earth Hour: 8:30pm, Saturday, 31 March 2012.

In under five years, Earth Hour has become the largest campaign in history for the planet. It has grown from one city, one country to over 135 countries and territories in 2011. Earth Hour — By The People, For The Planet.

Download the iCalendar reminder for Earth Hour 2012…

Switch off your lights for Earth Hour at 8:30pm, Saturday 31 March 2012 and celebrate your commitment to the planet with the people of the world!

History of Earth Hour

WWF started Earth Hour in 2007 in Sydney, Australia when 2.2 million individuals and more than 2,000 businesses turned their lights off for one hour to take a stand against climate change. Only a year later and Earth Hour had become a global sustainability movement with more than 50 million people across 35 countries participating. Global landmarks such as the Sydney Harbour Bridge, CN Tower in Toronto, Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, and Rome’s Colosseum, all stood in darkness, as symbols of hope for a cause that grows more urgent by the hour.

In 2011, Earth Hour saw hundreds of millions of people across 135 countries switch off for an hour. But it also marked the start of something new –going Beyond the Hour to commit to lasting action on sustainability.

Visit EarthHour.org for more ideas!

Categories: ecycler, event Tags: ,

Phoenix Faces Challenges Initiating Recycling Program for Multifamily Residences

March 1st, 2012 No comments

Phoenix, Arizona, named after the mythological firebird forever reborn from the ashes of its former self, is currently implementing a pilot recycling program for city-owned multifamily housing in low income neighborhoods. But there are particular challenges involved, mainly spreading awareness to residents regarding what goes into which receptacle, and inciting them to take advantage of such accessible means to recycle. In addition, city officials plan to overcome these obstacles by handing off awareness responsibilities to city property managers, a strategy that may lead to interesting outcomes.

The incentives for Phoenix to enact sustainability programs throughout city-owned property is clear. They need to reduce management costs over time and one way to do so is to make multifamily residences more sustainable. The pilot program being implemented at two city-owned apartment complexes, Park Lee Apartments and Sunnyslope Manor, hopes to prove this is possible, after which it will be extended to all low-income housing units under Phoenix ownership. If shown effective on such a grand scale, the program will be further expanded to cover all multifamily city residences to help curb waste management costs.

The problem is that property managers paid by the city are basically doing their bosses bidding by creating ways to inform residents as to the existence of recycling bins and the ways in which the waste is separated into them. Private-sector property managers aren’t going to be so pressured to go out of their way to inform and enforce a recycling program throughout low-income housing. In addition, initiating such a program among working-class, unemployed, and often unsettled droves of individuals raises its own set of challenges.

Such housing units in the northwest corridor between Phoenix and Scottsdale see all walks of life, from stay-at-home moms to transients to those who need just a little help getting back to being productive members of society. This diversity further complicates matters for those behind the program and managers tasked with making their property more sustainable. Schedules are odd, struggling families are resistant to change, and the residents themselves move in and out so much that it’s hard to ingrain any sort of habit change on a mass scale.

We know from experience a recycling program is successful based on these three factors:

  • Convenience
  • Education
  • Economics

Informing people about how to identify, separate and properly dispose of their recycling in and of itself takes little more than leaving fliers door to door and emailing a recycling FAQ. But things get harder when it comes to dishing out the responsibilities to property managers without offering incentives, and reaching out to individuals who are either too busy trying to get by to care or aren’t even bothered enough to throw their garbage in a trash can. Will Phoenix succeed in instituting a city-wide recycling program for multifamily residences? That depends on how badly they want to live up to their city’s namesake.

We can offer our Lessons Learned: Recycle Bin Setup

Read more…

Recovered Materials from Waste Stream

February 2nd, 2012 No comments

Great News for Recycling!

We’ve tallied our 2011 recycling numbers and would like to share some of them.

Exhibit A: From two local (to ecycler HQ in Chicago) sources we have recovered over 300 pounds of aluminum from tapping into what was previously a waste stream. Almost 9000 cans have been recycled from these two businesses, one a restaurant and one a large automobile dealership.

Of course, 10,000’s of cans and bottles have been recycled through ecycler, but these two businesses show a great density of materials for our collectors.

Exhibit B: In only a few months since launching our “hard-to-recycle materials” service, almost a thousand pounds of miscellaneous materials, like crayons, CD’s, VHS tapes, tennis balls have been diverted from the landfill to specialized recyclers. For example, 33 pounds of crayons have been transformed into new crayons ready for a child’s art project.

“In the process of Recovering Materials from a waste stream, everyone’s a winner. Fewer tons of waste go into the landfill—instead, those materials will find new life. This action not only creates a greener world for us, but also supplies much needed opportunities to the workforce.”

We started the collection of books for recycling in January 2012, a very exciting addition to the ten other hard-to-recycle materials already offered. Ecycler will continue to expand the recovery of materials by reducing the amount of recyclables going into the waste stream of businesses and residential households.

We now have the capability to recycle 11 materials:

CD’s, DVD’s and discs: http://ecycler.com/discs
Crayons: http://ecycler.com/crayons
Tennis Balls: http://ecycler.com/tennis_balls
Alkaline Batteries: http://ecycler.com/alkaline
Wine Bottle Corks: http://ecycler.com/corks
VHS Tapes: http://ecycler.com/VHS_tape
Inkjet Cartridges: http://ecycler.com/inkjet
Eyeglasses: http://ecycler.com/eyeglasses
Keys: http://ecycler.com/keys
Bicycle Inner Tubes: http://ecycler.com/inner_tubes
Books: http://ecycler.com/books

Make a difference and recycle with ecycler.com!

Help your books find good homes!

January 25th, 2012 No comments

Are you the kind of person that hates to discard used books for fear they’ll end up in a landfill?  Do those late-night pet adoption commercials get you thinking that you’d like to set up an adoption agency for used books?  We’re right there with you, and we’ve got some great news for you!

We Recycle Books: http://ecycler.com/books

We’re delighted to announce that we now accept books as a part of our recycling programs.  We’re committed to helping find good homes for your books, and now it’s easy to join in. Simply navigate to ecycler.com/books and click the Start Recycling Now button on the page, select the number of books you are recycling (or enter in the count). Fill in the form, print out your shipping label and then rest assured that your books are on their way to nice, new homes where they’ll be treated well, with lots of tender loving care.
Recycle your Books on ecycler.com

Books cannot be easily recycled like other paper, because of the chemicals, such as glue, and other binding materials used to make them, so reuse is a great option.

We happily accept all sorts of books, be they hardcover or softcover editions, new or old. All we ask is that the books be in decent condition, without mold or mildew. It’s okay if there are markings. Just use common sense – don’t send any books that you yourself wouldn’t want to receive. The books will transferred to the care of our recycling partner who shares our commitment to getting books out of the trash and into the hands of new readers. The goal is to give each book as many new lives as possible. Come join the revolution.

According to ALA Recycling Industries, in 2006 the U.S. printed more than 172,000 new book titles. In order to produce just one ton of paper needed for these new books, 3,688 lbs. of wood, 24,000 gallons of water, 216 lbs. of lime, 360 lbs. of salt cake and 76 lbs. of soda ash are required. The process produces 84 lbs. of air pollutants, 36 lbs. of water pollutants and 176 lbs. of solid waste which must be treated and properly discarded.

Happy recycling!

Attention, no books were harmed in the filming of these Crush that Can videos:

Thanks for Ben Oh for the use of his image
Categories: materials, recycle Tags: , ,

Reducing, Reusing and Recycling in the Workplace

January 17th, 2012 No comments

We often talk about (brag about!) being earth-friendly, going green and recycling in our home. But most of us spend a good portion of our lives in another environment, one that generates its own share of waste: the workplace. Whether you work for a large company or a small business, you likely have an office in which you spend five or more days a week. That office requires heating and cooling; it uses paper, appliances, and other materials; and it creates waste just as prolifically as does the home – if not more so.

If you are a business manager or simply an outspoken person in your office, you can take concerted steps toward reducing, reusing and recycling in the workplace. Here’s how:

REDUCE

Technology has made it increasingly easy to reduce in the workplace. By using cloud computing, electronic billing, and email communication a business can go paperless and save troves of trash (and money) the process. You can also reduce on your electricity consumption by installing intelligent thermostats and energy-efficient lighting. The possibilities are truly endless and the potential for savings are considerable. As a successful energy-reducer can tell you, you don’t need solar power to save on utilities in the workplace.

REUSE

Changing workplace trends dictate that companies are always creating waste. Every technological and management change likely yields discarded furniture, printers, and various other office items. All of these materials can be donated to agencies that will help reuse them in some capacity. An office truly committed to being environmentally-friendly is not one that will leave generations of printers sitting in a landfill.

RECYCLE

Most people find it far easier to recycle in the home than in the workplace. The reason? At home, many of us have a dedicated bin for trash and another one dedicated for recycling. Every time we empty the trash or take the bins to the curb we are reminded to sort the recyclables out from the items that are not. We often don’t get this kind of reminder in the office, where trash receptacles are abundant but recycling bins are a far rarer find. There’s an easy solution to this, however: next to every trash can add a well-marked recycling bin. Certainly make sure there is one in the kitchen or wherever employees tend to eat their lunch.

Hopefully these tips can help your business better reduce, reuse and recycle. Doing so not only helps the environment, but can also translate favorably towards the company’s bottom line. As far as the workplace is concerned, there’s really no reason not to go green.

Top-20 Ways to Make your Business Greenerhttp://blog.ecycler.com/2010/11/13/top-20-ways-to-make-your-business-greener/

Read more…

Connect with Us on Pinterest!

December 31st, 2011 No comments

We are all about recycling and being green. Some may call it junk, but it can certainly be reused, recycled or upcycled! With so much upcycling inspiration around here, we thought Pinterest would be a great place to showcase some of our discoveries!

If you’re not familiar with Pinterest, think of it as a place to create virtual inspiration boards. If you see a craft project, a recipe, or anything else that inspires you, you can “pin it” on your Pinterest account to find later (and to show-off to the world!).

We use ecyler’s Pinterest board to bookmark and share awesome, eco-friendly, upcycled stuff that we stumble across. We want to create a pinboard that’s got green crafty inspiration for home decor, clothing and accessories and any other awesome upcycled or revamped craft projects we stumble upon in our travels. We also post some interesting images of recycling of materials from aluminum cans to wine bottle corks.

Want to keep up with the eco-friendly, upcycle action on Pinterest? Follow the ecycler Pinterest board! We’d also love to connect with other green pinners out there. Do you have a Pinterest account? Tell us who you are in the comments!

Even Guam has a Bottle Bill!

October 31st, 2011 No comments

In the final days of his administration, the Governor of Guam, Felix Camacho, signed into law Bottle Bill 149 proposed by Sen. Tina Muna Barnes in June 2009, which adds a five cent deposit on beverage containers identified for recycling efforts. It’s now been almost a year (30 Dec 2010) since Public Law 30-221 went into affect.

A little background… After three attempts at introducing bottle bill legislation, Barnes’ attempts have finally paid off. Barnes added that the effort to introduce a bottle bill has spanned 30 years through seven legislative authors.

The five cent deposit will go into a Beverage Container Recycling Deposit Fund administrated by the Guam Environmental Protection Agency. Four cents for each container will be returned to the customer and one cent will be used for administrative and auditing costs and educational outreach.

There are currently 10 states that have a container deposit law. They are California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Oregon and Vermont.

Many of the states have reported an increase in recycling and participation efforts. For example, in California, recycling rates increased significantly from 52 percent in 1988, when the law was implemented, to 82 percent participation in 2009.

According to bottlebill.org, the legislation helps to prevent litter, promote recycling, reduce waste, create jobs, and provide financial incentives for recycling, among other environmental and economic benefits.

“This bill is not just an environmental issue. It is also an economic issue. Residents will be proactively engaged in reducing the litter on our beaches, roadways and jungles.” Sen Barnes goes on to say, “This legislation will help alleviate the burden placed on the Tourism Attraction Fund and other tax dollars spent on removing and reducing litter. It will encourage the development of young entrepreneurs who will enter into public private partnerships while improving our environment and stimulating our economy. The Bottle Bill is the first step our youth will take toward jobs of the future…green jobs.”

The specifics are still being hammered out; several subcommittees were formed to address rules and regulations, operations and permitting, finance, and outreach.

Categories: legislation, recycle Tags: ,